Don’t Be This Guy: Bad Social Media Manners

My friends and colleagues know how rabid I am about my undergraduate alma mater and that I take care of my fellow Orange people. Syracuse pride runs in my blood and I love to help students and alumni any way I can.

About five months ago, I met a May 2010 graduate at a networking event and we had a nice conversation. This recent graduate had a lot of bravado, but he told me that his dad is an multi-company entrepreneur and he worked for him, so that attitude made sense to me.

When I got back to my office, I sent this recent grad an email and followed him on Twitter. He never responded and didn’t follow me back. I wasn’t bothered. He wasn’t looking for an entry-level position and didn’t need a career coach, and people are busy. I kept following him on Twitter because some of his articles interested me and he talked about Syracuse basketball. Sometimes I replied or re-tweeted what he wrote. No response, but again, Twitter can be a huge cocktail party and I don’t take it personally when people don’t get back to me. Maybe my replies had no interest to him and that is fair.

But… last week, I saw that I was added to a list called Super Sidekicks. Puzzled, I checked the list to see what this was. This person had added me to this list and the description was “Like loyal sidekicks, these people share my tweets most.”

Huh. A loyal sidekick who you don’t follow and know nothing about. A loyal sidekick who is 13 years your senior, has built a really successful career without the privilege you’ve had and once taught sixth graders who are now older than you. Really now? I can deal with bravado, but  can’t handle obnoxious narcissism. I unfollowed him and sent a reply to take me off the list, but no response. No Orange love for him.

Really, this isn’t that a big deal to me, but I am bringing it up to make a point. It’s probably not a big leap to assume that Mr. Bravado’s issues transcend social media- most online issues are also things people deal with offline. Maybe he should think about this quote from Buddy Cianci, two-time mayor of Providence, RI, when managing his relationships:  “The toe you stepped on yesterday may be connected to the ass you have to kiss today.”

Don’t be this guy.

Posted via email from The Opportunities Project Blog

 

  • Steve Levy

    Social media platforms allow people to be as transparent or engaged as they choose. Which path is most correct?

    I only know what works for me.

    • I am not sure what your comment means… I think the real problem is that people are not self-aware on social media and how what they do looks to virtual strangers.

      Or maybe this is a generational thing. Maybe being 13 years his senior, I just don’t get it.