Archive | events

RSS feed for this section

Sorry, Your Resume Does Matter: Tips from a Recruiter

The universe is telling me that it’s time to get out of my entrepreneur/new small business owner haze for a bit and write a quick blog post on resumes. Three things awakened me to this realization this week.

(1) Everyday I see at least one tweet scroll by or an article in my Google reader that talks about how resumes aren’t all that important because jobs are obtained through networking. I saw one last night that left me both tired and boiling mad at the same time.

Resumes and Networking are not opposite concepts or tools. Hot is to Cold is not the same as Networking is to Having a Great Resume.  When networking, you may meet the best contact ever, but if  he has no job openings, he will want to pass on your resume to someone in his network. His contact will likely put great stock in the personal recommendation, but your candidacy has to stand on its own and that has to be reflected, at least in part, on paper.

(2) Resumes were a hot topic on Monday night’s Twitter #jobhuntchat. Recruiters and HR folks were telling jobseekers that most of them actually don’t know how to do a resume, and the jobseekers were telling the recruiters they have great resumes. What was interesting is that the recruiters were all tweeting the same advice on resumes, but in most cases, the jobseekers  still weren’t convinced to follow it.

BTW- what’s a Twitter chat you might ask? It’s when a bunch of people (sometimes over 100) get together for an hour to chat on a topic that interests them. A host throws out 5-6 questions and you share your thoughts, reply to other’s thoughts, and retweet things you like to your followers. Everything you do, you include the hashtag in the Tweet. Yes, just writing some of these terms makes me feel like a teenager. But participating in the #jobhuntchat and the #genychat have been some of the best hours I have spent in the last week in making connections, challenging my thoughts, and becoming a better career coach.

(3) We had an awesome first stop on the Cocktails and Careers Tour last night at The Village Pourhouse. People brought their resumes and I did some free reviews over a Guinness. Everyone who came was great and super-focused and I have no doubts with some tweaks to their approach and how they express their brand, they’ll be hired soon. But when I was reviewing one resume, the person kept bringing up advice that she had received at a workshop offered by the public library. For example, she was told ALWAYS use an objective, while I was telling her it was taking up valuable real estate on her resume. If all of your experience is in one area and you’re applying for a job in that same area, I know your objective. I also told her to ditch her AOL email address and she was skeptical, again, because this was in conflict with information she had heard at this workshop.  I am not criticizing her- she was legitimately confused.

So I have three resume tips to share this week. The first tip is now obvious, but it’s to defer to advice being given by real people who hire and recruit. They see resumes all day long and can tell you what stands out to them based on evidence. If you’re a college student or alum using the career office, you should absolutely question where counselors are getting their ideas and if they are requesting and incorporating feedback from employers into their advice to you. What they are telling you could be taken from a book published in 1999.  Likewise, other jobseekers or moms and dads may have great feedback, but if it’s different than what an expert is telling you, you should defer to the expert.

I am becoming more and more convinced that jobseeking is like teaching. Everyone experiences it in some form or other (in the case of teaching, as a student), so they think they know how to do it and love to advise others. But hard data shows that only a small percentage actually succeed at either.

And on that note, if you are in New York City and want your resume reviewed by an expert recruiter, come join me on the Cocktails and Careers Tour. Our next two stops (September 15 and 18) are at The Copper Door Tavern. They are excited to have us and have offered us $12 bottomless glasses of wine tonight. Wine makes resume reviews so much easier.

Cocktail and Career Tour Starts This Week!

I’m about to hit another first milestone in my business this week: hosting my own events! Starting September 14, 2010, I will be having a series of FREE Cocktail and Career happy hours. I really liked just talking with people at the Working NYC event we participated in this summer and want to model these events after that experience. People should feel free to come and just talk with me about any career issues they are facing over a drink at any of the four happy hours. Many of the bars where we are having these events are offering us specials and are excited to be helping people with their careers. We are also holding bar tab raffles for people who Like our Facebook page.

Setting up these events was very interesting for me. In my last job, Isomeone else set set up evnts and she was awesome at it. One thing I knew was that I was definitely NOT awesome at it, so I asked for help from one of my former students to scope out space. I taught fourth and sixth grade in Washington Heights in the late 90s and have stayed in touch with many of my former students who are now in their early 20s and pursuing their own careers. One of my amazing former sixth graders, Glendy, is now a grown-up student at Lehman College and volunteered to come out and try out places and be in some pictures to document our adventure. We saw about six bars and together we settled on The Village Pourhouse, The Copper Door Tavern, and Thunder Jackson’s (not pictured).

Here are the details on the events.

Tuesday, September 14, 2010, 4:30 to 6:30 PM @ The Village Pourhouse

982 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10025

If you have a Columbia University ID and Like our Facebook page, you will be entered into a raffle to have your tab paid for the night (up to $25).

Wednesday, September 15, 2010, 4:30 to 6:30 PM @ The Copper Door Tavern

272 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10010

If you have a Baruch College ID and Like our Facebook page, you will be entered into a raffle to have your tab paid for the night (up to $25).

Saturday, September 18, 2010, 1:00 to 4:00 PM @ The Copper Door Tavern

272 3rd Ave, New York, NY 10010

EVERYONE who Likes our Facebook page, you will be entered into a raffle to have your tab paid for the night (up to $25).

Monday, September 20, 2010, 6:00 to 8:00 PM @ Thunder Jackson’s

169 Bleecker Street, New York, NY 10012

If you have a NYU College ID and Like our Facebook page, you will be entered into a raffle to have your tab paid for the night (up to $25).

Getting Ready for NACE

I’m getting ready for The Opportunities Project’s first NACE conference and am looking at the attendee list and writing down the names of people from all the colleges and service organizations who I want to meet. I am eager to talk to people both to learn about the great things they’re doing and talk about partnering. The list of people is long, as well as the list of questions I want to ask. Here are two questions that keep coming back to me.

  1. How are college career centers held accountable for the success of their services? Coming from an organization that is squarely about accountability (What is your impact on teacher and student success? How satisfied are they with your services?), I am amazed that I can’t find this easily via the internet. So far, I have only seen stats on career placement on American University’s website and only see one session on this at NACE, but I am not sure it’s going to answer my question. I am going to continue my search for data on college career center success.
  2. How do colleges design their career center websites? In my research on these websites, I have seen as much crazy, disorganized stuff as the good. No, I will not be linking to examples- I am trying to make friends!

I have more questions, but it is Memorial Day Weekend and I don’t want anyone to have to think too hard. Follow my updates from the NACE conference next week on Twitter.